Alcohol Industry Bribed Congress To Demonize Cannabis: Wikileaks

Many logical people are baffled at why a country would make marijuana illegal while alcohol is legal. When one compares the effects of marijuana to alcohol, there really is no competition.

Starting with the direct death toll, alcohol is responsible for approximately 88,000 deaths in the United States each year and marijuana 0, according to True Activist.

In addition, people can die from overdosing on alcohol but that is not the case with marijuana. Alcohol use damages peoples’ brains, marijuana use does not. Regularly smoking a lot of marijuana will eventually take its toll on the lungs, but far less than cigarettes.

Unfortunately, the average individual in America has not been informed of these facts and still believes that marijuana is a “gateway” drug to actual drugs. This is mainly because the U.S. government has blatantly lied about cannabis – and its multitude of uses – for decades, reported True Activist.

Until the early 1900’s in the United States, it was still considered perfectly acceptable to grow and harvest cannabis. Things took a turn for the worse, however, when fear of the herb arose during the Great Depression and marijuana was banned in over 20 states.

The cannabis plant, and hemp, can be used for a number of applications – not limited to industrial, clothes, and medicine – it is still a plant that is typically demonized by mainstream media and politicians.

According to recently exposed information by WikiLeaks, the alcohol industry has bribed officials to discredit and trash the herb, and that is why it continues to happen.

True Activist reported a blogger for the cannabis industry website Marijuana.com dug through hundreds of leaked DNC emails for any reference to the misunderstood herb. What they found was in the May 24, 2016, edition of Huddle, which is a daily e-newsletter for Capitol Hill insiders produced by the Politico website.

Reportedly, the issue included a paid advertisement from the Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of America (WSWA). Part of the ad is below:

“While neutral on the issue of legalization, WSWA believes states that legalize marijuana need to ensure appropriate and effective regulations are enacted to protect the public from the dangers associated with the abuse and misuse of marijuana… In the years since the state legalized medicinal use, Colorado law enforcement officials have documented a significant increase in traffic fatalities in which drivers tested positive for marijuana… 

Congress should fully fund Section 4008 of the FAST Act (PL 114-94) in the FY 2017 Appropriations process to document the prevalence of marijuana-impaired driving, outline impairment standards and determine driving impairment detection methods.”

In addition to appearing on the WikiLeaks website, that particular bit of information can be found on InboxCart, a website that archives e-newsletters. However, because the WSWA statement does not appear with the text of that issue in the Huddle archive on Politico, it seems the advertisement and sponsorship credit seems to have only appeared in the version sent directly to the inboxes of Congress members and Beltway insiders.

In a press release, the WSWA said:

“There is currently no scientific consensus regarding the level at which marijuana consumption impairs a driver and no effective way to measure this impairment in the field. This is problematic for law enforcement who, in contrast, can quickly and effectively establish a scientifically and legally-supported measure of alcohol impairment.”

Many believe that the alcohol industry is aware that as recreational use of marijuana becomes legal and less taboo, more people are likely to opt for the herb rather than sacrifice their health and sanity of mind with spirits. This will lead to diminishing profits for beer, wine and liquor manufacturers and sellers.

In result, the industry is doing whatever it can to impede cannabis legalization, something Morgan Fox, the communications director for the Marijuana Policy Project, says it should be wary of doing. Fox says:

“No one should be driving while impaired by marijuana, and we should certainly be doing more research into all aspects of the substance, including its impact on driving. However, given that driving under the influence of marijuana is already illegal and that the existing research shows marijuana’s effect on driving ability is significantly less than alcohol, it is difficult to see a legitimate reason for the alcohol industry to be taking up this issue. They would do better to fund research on how to decrease drunk driving.”

Without question, the destruction of roads and highways in the U.S. is a critical issue, but the topic of “marijuana-impaired driving” is vastly misunderstood. For example, Colorado has witnessed an increase in fatalities since the herb was legalized in 2012, but the increase in deaths is consistent with the national trend and is more than likely related to low oil prices (and the influx of migrants to the state).

And, the WSWA failed to mention that in 2011, a study found a reduction in traffic fatalities in states that had legalized medical marijuana.